HERMAN GROSS

BIOGRAPHY

AS RECORDED IN:

COMMEMORATIVE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF 
TOLLAND AND WINDHAM COUNTIES CONNECTICUT.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PROMINENT AND REPRESENTATIVE  CITIZENS AND OF MANY OF THE EARLY SETTLED FAMILIES
PUBLISHER: J.H.BEERS & CO., CHICAGO; 1903     P.  1340

HERMAN GROSS  (deceased).  The birth of the subject of this biography was in the land which has given to America some of her most reliable and esteemed citizens.  From the year 1870, when Herman Gross landed in the United States with little more capital than energy and determination to succeed, until his lamented death on April 14, 1895, he lived a useful and industrious life, and his memory is tenderly cherished by those for whom he labored so long and successfully, as well as by the community in which he was an example of honest and upright living.

Herman Gross was born in Saxony, Germany, Oct. 15, 1842, a son of William Gross, who followed the trade of butcher in his own land, Herman being the only one of the family who came to America.  While still in Germany our subject learned the trade of weaver, but on account of small wages and other labor conditions, Mr. Gross determined to try his fortunes across the Atlantic.  On Nov. 15, 1867, Mr. Gross was married, in Germany, to Miss Mary Dimlow, daughter of John and Christina Dimlow, who was born Feb. 22, 1849.  In May, 1870, Mr. Gross left his wife and two children, Clara and Hugo, in the old home, and sailed from Bremen for New York.  The first work at his trade was secured at Broad Brook, Conn., and conditions seeming favorable, he was soon in a position to send for his family, who landed in New York the same autumn and joined Mr. Gross at Broad Brook.  Wages were good and in Mrs. Gross he had an economical and careful helpmate, and ere long means accumulated, and the family became very comfortable.

In 1872 they removed to Rockville, where Mr. Gross was employed in the dye house at the Florence Mills, from which a few years later he went to the Hockanum Mill, taking a position in the dye house.  Each year showed an improvement in the financial condition of the family, and the time came when Mr. Gross was able to purchase a most comfortable home on Windermere avenue.  Tiring at last of the trying duties in the mill, Mr. Gross resigned and engaged himself in the butcher business with W.E. Strong, succeeding so well that at the time of his decease, he was an extensive owner of real estate in this city, and was considered a substantial man.

The family of Mr. and Mrs. Gross numbered five children:  Clara, now Mrs. Robert C. Flamin, of Rockville, has one son, Harry;  Hugo married Miss Mary Graff, of Rockville, and has a daughter, Bertha;  William;  Frank; and Hattie.  In politics, Mr. Gross voted with the Democratic party, but was a quiet and orderly man who attended closely to his private business, leaving office holding to others who had more taste for such prominence.  The business affairs have been and are still carefully and efficiently conducted by Mrs. Gross, a lady of ability who in no small way contributed to the success of her husband.  The religious connection of the whole family is with the

German Lutheran Church, where our subject was highly valued, and where the family is much esteemed.    

Reproduced by:

Linda D. Pingel

 

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